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Travel to Barcelona in 5 Cocktails

Travel to Barcelona in 5 Cocktails

Not traveling anywhere for the holidays? Pretend you're in Barcelona with these 5 cocktails

These drinks, featuring cava, gin, and other spirits, are the epitome of Barcelona drinking culture.

The food of Spain's Catalonia region is known for many things: Ferran Adrià's innovative cuisine in the days of elBulli, for one, but also a vast array of stews, roasts, casseroles, and more dishes that take on the flavors of the Mediterranean, Spain, France, Italy, and more.

Click here for the Travel to Barcelona in 5 Cocktails Slideshow.

And with a vast array of food must come a fine selection of tipples; 95 percent of cava (or Spanish champagne) is produced in the Catalonian region Penedès, not far from Barcelona. The three grapes blended to create cava, macabeo, xarel-lo, and parellada, create a sparkling wine that's fruitier than champagne but drier than prosecco.

Spain in general, however, has a terrific drinking culture; punches and cocktails are plentiful (sangria, anyone?), gin and tonic bars have become staples from Madrid to Barcelona, and drinkers down dangerously delicious glasses of kalimotxo (red wine and cola).

Hotel Arts Barcelona shares some of its most popular cocktails, all inspired by the arts, culture, and epicurean sensibilities of Barcelona. You might not be able to fly to Spain on a whim, but at least you can drink like you’re overlooking La Sagrada Familia. Click here for the recipes.


Lots of delicious tapas recipes

Tapas used to be served as a snack before the main course. Today they are a self-contained part of the Catalonian way of life. In Barcelona you will find lots of tapas bars where you can enjoy a drink and try the different tapas. Eating tapas has evolved to asocial event, just like eating fondue or raclette have. The tapas dishes are eaten in a relaxed atmosphere of a group of people.

While there are typical Catalonian tapas recipes, you will find tapas from all over Spain in Barcelona's many tapas bars..


5 Hawaiian-Style Cocktails – And Where in the Islands to Try Them

One of the great pleasures of being in Hawaii is sitting outside in the sun, sipping a tropical drink, while contemplating the gorgeous views on offer. While rum is nearly as ubiquitous in a Hawaiian drink as a wedge of pineapple, a fresh orchid, or a small paper umbrella, it’s not the only ingredient you’ll find when you step out to imbibe. Here, five cocktails not to miss – and where to find them in Honolulu – on your next tropical trip.

One of the great pleasures of being in Hawaii is sitting outside in the sun, sipping a tropical drink, while contemplating the gorgeous views on offer. While rum is nearly as ubiquitous in a Hawaiian drink as a wedge of pineapple, a fresh orchid, or a small paper umbrella, it’s not the only ingredient you’ll find when you step out to imbibe. Here, five cocktails not to miss – and where to find them in Honolulu – on your next tropical trip.

A Mai Tai is the drink that usually comes to mind when the words &ldquoHawaiian cocktail&rdquo are mentioned. Its distinctive multi-colored look comes from using white rum as the base and adding a float of dark rum on top. Orange curaçao and orgeat syrup are also key ingredients, along with fresh juices. There&rsquos no better place to enjoy a Mai Tai than House Without a Key at Halekulani, where the outdoor cocktail seating gives you a view of both Diamond Head, the sunset, and graceful hula performances. House Without a Key&rsquos cocktail features three different kinds of rum and is decorated with a slice of lime, a sprig of mint, a stick of sugar cane, and an orchid &ndash also making it the prettiest Mai Tai. The restaurant&rsquos &ldquoHale Tai&rdquo is swirled with spiced and coconut rums and lilikoi (passionfruit) juice, making it a bit sweeter than the regular Mai Tai.

A Mai Tai is the drink that usually comes to mind when the words &ldquoHawaiian cocktail&rdquo are mentioned. Its distinctive multi-colored look comes from using white rum as the base and adding a float of dark rum on top. Orange curaçao and orgeat syrup are also key ingredients, along with fresh juices. There&rsquos no better place to enjoy a Mai Tai than House Without a Key at Halekulani, where the outdoor cocktail seating gives you a view of both Diamond Head, the sunset, and graceful hula performances. House Without a Key&rsquos cocktail features three different kinds of rum and is decorated with a slice of lime, a sprig of mint, a stick of sugar cane, and an orchid &ndash also making it the prettiest Mai Tai. The restaurant&rsquos &ldquoHale Tai&rdquo is swirled with spiced and coconut rums and lilikoi (passionfruit) juice, making it a bit sweeter than the regular Mai Tai.

This is the drink that gives you more bang for your buck in addition to rum, the recipe also calls for a shot of bourbon. Lilikoi juice sweetens the mix, and it&rsquos topped by a float of dark rum. The cocktail was created by the legendary Henry Yee, a bartender at the Hilton Hawaiian Village Waikiki Beach Resort for more than 30 years (he also created other well-known drinks like the Blue Hawaii). The gimmick with this cocktail is that it&rsquos served with a bamboo backscratcher instead of a swizzle stick &ndash to scratch your &ldquoitch.&rdquo

This is the drink that gives you more bang for your buck in addition to rum, the recipe also calls for a shot of bourbon. Lilikoi juice sweetens the mix, and it&rsquos topped by a float of dark rum. The cocktail was created by the legendary Henry Yee, a bartender at the Hilton Hawaiian Village Waikiki Beach Resort for more than 30 years (he also created other well-known drinks like the Blue Hawaii). The gimmick with this cocktail is that it&rsquos served with a bamboo backscratcher instead of a swizzle stick &ndash to scratch your &ldquoitch.&rdquo

You&rsquoll find this drink at La Mariana Sailing Club, which is one of Honolulu's few genuine old-school Tiki lounges still standing. The Bahama starts out like a Mai Tai, then tempers the alcohol with orange and pineapple juices, before finally adding Kahlua to give the potent drink a sweet smokiness. La Mariana isn&rsquot easy to find it&rsquos hidden on a side street just off Sand Island Access Road, in an industrial area of Honolulu. But it&rsquos well worth the effort to get there, for the ambience, hearty fare, and strong drinks. (Landlubbers should be especially wary of the La Mariana Tea: vodka, gin, rum, peach schnapps, triple sec, sweet and sour, &ldquoand a splash of cranberry juice.&rdquo)

You&rsquoll find this drink at La Mariana Sailing Club, which is one of Honolulu's few genuine old-school Tiki lounges still standing. The Bahama starts out like a Mai Tai, then tempers the alcohol with orange and pineapple juices, before finally adding Kahlua to give the potent drink a sweet smokiness. La Mariana isn&rsquot easy to find it&rsquos hidden on a side street just off Sand Island Access Road, in an industrial area of Honolulu. But it&rsquos well worth the effort to get there, for the ambience, hearty fare, and strong drinks. (Landlubbers should be especially wary of the La Mariana Tea: vodka, gin, rum, peach schnapps, triple sec, sweet and sour, &ldquoand a splash of cranberry juice.&rdquo)

The Cuban classic gets a tropical spin at Duke&rsquos Waikiki (which has two outposts in California). In the coconut mojito, all the ingredients of the standard mojito are present: rum, lime juice, and mint. But instead of simple syrup, this cocktail uses coconut cream for sweetness, as well as Kai Coconut Shochu (a liquor distilled from rice), making this blended beverage as refreshing as its Cuban counterpart. Get to Duke&rsquos early if you want to snag a seat. If nothing&rsquos available you can always find a space to stand in the raucous Barefoot Bar &ndash or Henry Kapono&rsquos weekly Sunday showcase, at Duke&rsquos lower patio, is another big draw.

The Cuban classic gets a tropical spin at Duke&rsquos Waikiki (which has two outposts in California). In the coconut mojito, all the ingredients of the standard mojito are present: rum, lime juice, and mint. But instead of simple syrup, this cocktail uses coconut cream for sweetness, as well as Kai Coconut Shochu (a liquor distilled from rice), making this blended beverage as refreshing as its Cuban counterpart. Get to Duke&rsquos early if you want to snag a seat. If nothing&rsquos available you can always find a space to stand in the raucous Barefoot Bar &ndash or Henry Kapono&rsquos weekly Sunday showcase, at Duke&rsquos lower patio, is another big draw.

This cocktail, like the Tropical Itch, combines two liquors for extra potency &ndash spiced rum and blood orange vodka, in this case. It's a fun, fizzy drink that also features cranberry juice and a splash of Sprite. You&rsquoll find it at RumFire, a lounge at the Sheraton Waikiki, where we suggest getting a table on the west side of the outside patio for a view of both Diamond Head and the sunset. And just in case you want to change it up after trying the Captain's Demise, the cocktail menu is extensive, with five types of Mai Tais alone. Another favorite is Gidget&rsquos Crush, a light, not-too-sweet concoction of citrus vodka, watermelon liqueur, lime juice, and Sprite.

This cocktail, like the Tropical Itch, combines two liquors for extra potency &ndash spiced rum and blood orange vodka, in this case. It's a fun, fizzy drink that also features cranberry juice and a splash of Sprite. You&rsquoll find it at RumFire, a lounge at the Sheraton Waikiki, where we suggest getting a table on the west side of the outside patio for a view of both Diamond Head and the sunset. And just in case you want to change it up after trying the Captain's Demise, the cocktail menu is extensive, with five types of Mai Tais alone. Another favorite is Gidget&rsquos Crush, a light, not-too-sweet concoction of citrus vodka, watermelon liqueur, lime juice, and Sprite.


Fun, Classic Spanish Drinks & Cocktails You Can’t Miss Out On!


When it comes to going out, it is important to know what to order as a drink. Spain has some unique delicious drinks that you should really try. As the weather keeps on getting warmer, the days of sitting outside sipping a refreshing beverage as fast approaching. What better way to get to know Barcelona than by tasting all the drinks that are special to Spain. We’ve compiled a list of some of our favorites so give them a try!

Agua de Valencia


This drink is a combination of cava, orange juice, vodka, and gin. It is a must to try while you are here in Spain. The key to this drink is the world famous orange from Valencia. It is a different take on the traditional mimosa.

Orxata

Don’t confuse this with horchata from Mexico and Latin America. This drink originated from the region of Catolonia, specifically, Valencia. It is a refreshing cold drink made with tigernuts (chufa), suger, and water poured over ice. It is typically served along with a sweet pastry called fartons, which can dipped in the Orxata

Sangria


This is the most popular drinks in Spain, especially when the weather gets warm. It is usually made in a large punch bowl and served in large jug, which allows all of the fruits and flavors to mix together.

Queimada


It is also known as the Gallician Fire Drink. Made from licor de Orujo, it is often put into a clay pot along with pieces of lemon, coffee beans, and sugar. After some time has passed, it is set on fire. The fire is put out once the clay pot turns blue and then the drink is served in small ceramic mugs. It hot, so make sure to blow on it and leave it to cool before drinking it.

Tinto de Verano


This is a very popular Spanish wine cocktail that it super similar to sangria. To make this drink all you need is red wine and a lemon flavored carbonated drink so that it is half lemonade and half wine. The drink is typically served in a long tall glass with a lot of ice cubes and slice of lemon.

Leche de Pantera


A mixture of milk and liquor, this drink was made popular during the 1970s. Often times it can include condensed milk, ginger, and even egg yolks and cinnamon. It is always served cold over ice. Definitely try it while you are in Barcelona.

Vermouth


This drink has recently made a comeback in Barcelona. It was traditionally used for medical purposes, but now it is the perfect mid-afternoon or early evening treat. The wine is aromatic, fortified, and flavored with a variety of botanicals. There are two main varieties: red (sweet) and white (dry) vermouth. It is served over ice with a slice of orange or lemon.


Around the world in 5 summer cocktails

Read on for a bit of history on the world’s finest summer cocktails, as well as the best places to enjoy them.

Pimm’s in the UK

Pimm's is synonymous with summer in England

A cocktail that’s synonymous with summer in England, Pimm’s is the quintessential drink of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships (with an average of 320,000 glasses served at the tournament each year). It’s also the tipple of choice at the Chelsea Flower Show, the Henley Royal Regatta, and pretty much every English picnic or garden party from June till September. The classic recipe contains one part Pimm’s (a spicy, fruity liqueur), three parts lemonade, ice and a jug filled to the brim with fresh fruit, cucumber and mint. Check into the Dog & Fox, a traditionally-English gastropub with contemporary touches that’s just 15 minutes’ walk from the All England Club in Wimbledon.

Sangria in Spain

Enjoy a massive, ice-cold pitcher of sangria on a Barcelona beach in summer

Though it’s mostly tourists rather than locals that sip on sangria, it’s still probably the most famous drink to have come out of Spain. And nothing beats a massive, ice-cold pitcher on a Barcelona beach in summer. Recipes vary but are based on a combination of sweet and dry red wine with orange juice, sugar, wedges of citrus fruit and triple sec (or other liqueurs) added for an extra kick. Just don’t settle for a tinto de verano instead this cheaper Spanish drink is simply red wine, ice and sweetened soda water and – though deceptive – isn’t the real deal. The rooftop of Barcelona’s highly rated Hotel Casa Camper makes a fine setting for a sunset sangria.

Mint julep in the USA

Mint juleps are traditionally served in silver cups that frost up when filled with a mound of crushed ice

This refreshing, minty cocktail is the traditional drink of the Kentucky Derby in Louisville, and a favourite of the Southern states. A bourbon-based beverage, it’s surprisingly simple, containing only sugar, mint and a lot of crushed ice. Traditionally served in a silver cup that frosts up once you fill it with a mound of crushed ice, it’s all about the presentation. But thankfully, it tastes just as good as it looks. Stay at the 21c Museum Hotel Louisville, where you can wander around the on-site art gallery while sipping on your mint julep.

Caipirinha in Brazil

The best place to enjoy a caipirinha is Copacabana Beach

Hard to pronounce (it should be kai-pee-reen-ya) but delicious to drink, the caipirinha is Brazil’s national tipple. It’s a simple cocktail of cachaça (a Brazilian rum-like spirit), lime and sugar but be warned – it can be pretty potent. You’ll find many different variations in Brazil, including coconut, mango and watermelon, but there’s only one way to enjoy it ice-cold and on Rio’s Copacabana Beach. Try mixing your own caipirinhas in your Penthouse NS Copacabana apartment before heading down to the beach (200 metres away).

Piña colada in Puerto Rico

A coconutty, creamy concoction that encapsulates its tropical birthplace, Puerto Rico

This coconutty, creamy concoction encapsulates the tropical flavours of its birthplace, Puerto Rico, perfectly. The name translates to ‘strained pineapple’, though to classify as a pina colada, it’s also got to have rum and coconut cream. There are several bars in the Puerto Rican capital, San Juan, that claim to have invented this national drink but you’ll find fantastic variations all over the country from swanky hotels and restaurants to beach shacks and roadside stands. Check into Casa Isabel B&B for piña coladas on the terrace, or walk 9 minutes for cocktails on the beach.


36 Hours in Barcelona, Spain

BARCELONA is always gravitating toward what’s next, what’s new. Sure, the Catalan capital in northeastern Spain is rich with historic sites and classic tourist activities — browsing the centuries-old Boqueria market, studying the works of Picasso and Miró, posing with Gaudí’s frosted fairytale houses in Parc Güell — but the city’s current dynamism is rooted elsewhere. To discover what’s fueling Barcelona right now, look to new contemporary art museums and small galleries. Look to the bold tapas bars and buzzing night life rejuvenating outlying neighborhoods. Look to the new, but make time for old favorites too.

4 p.m.
1. HOUSES OF GAUDí

Strolling the city’s grand, leafy boulevards is itself a pleasure, but simultaneously sampling, albeit superficially, some of the masterful works by the Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí makes a walking tour even more marvelous. Starting in L’Eixample, head south on Passeig de Gràcia, past the sinuous facade of Casa Milà, also known as La Pedrera (No. 92 34-93-484-5900 lapedreraeducacio.org), and the spellbinding exterior of Casa Batlló (No. 43 34-93-216-0306 casabatllo.es). Continue down La Rambla to Palau Güell (Carrer Nou de la Rambla, 3-5 34-93-472-5775 palauguell.cat), a dazzling mansion that reopened in 2011 after seven years of restoration. Inside, trace Gaudí’s genius from the subterranean horse stables and exquisite living quarters to the whimsical rooftop chimneys.

Image

8:30 p.m.
2. MEAL TICKETS

Since the celebrated El Bulli served its final meal, those seeking to taste the gastronomic wizardry of the brothers Ferran and Albert Adrià have turned to Tickets (Avinguda del Parallel, 164 no phone ticketsbar.es), a carnivalesque tapas restaurant that opened last year under Albert’s charge in the city’s historic theater district. With a red-carpet entrance and marquee lights, the restaurant promises to unspool a mesmerizing show of its own. Once seated, don’t miss the “liquid” olives (8.30 euros for six, or $10.70 at $1.30 to the euro), the juicy tuna belly painted with jamón ibérico fat (13.50 euros), and a cone from the roving ice cream cart (3.50 euros). Reservations essential.

Midnight
3. DANCING IN THE CLOUDS


Where to Eat and Drink in Barcelona, Spain

Barcelona has earned international bragging rights for its far-out gastronomy (foams! spheres! airs!), but now down-to-earth and, frankly, more soul-satisfying foods are hitting the tables of the moment. Low-key cafés, ingredient-driven fare, and straightforward presentations are the new norm. The return to simpler food may be the one good thing to come of la crisis . Spain’s economic downturn has Michelin-starred chefs trading tasting menus for tapas bars, beachside shacks, and ice cream shops. And those unfussy cocktails—like G&Ts and vermouth and soda—are back in vogue, too. Here, 10 ways to enjoy Barcelona’s modern modest side.

La Boqueria is still Barcelona’s best market—and also its most touristy. The earlier in the morning you get there, the fewer elbows you’ll have to throw at ruthless grandmothers. How to navigate it: Skip the center aisle, where prices are higher. And if you want to be mistaken for a local, take a pass on the juices and spendy cut fruit as well.


The Yellow Bird

Savor a classic rum cocktail enjoyed by visitors and locals alike at Elbow Beach Bermuda. It’s a fruity signature sip of head bartender Charles Bristol, who has been with the hotel and the Lido Complex for more than 25 years.

Sliced pineapple, orange and maraschino cherry

Combine Bacardi, banana liqueur and pineapple juice together in a cocktail shaker with ice cubes. Strain into a glass filled with ice. Float Galliano on top. Garnish with a cherry and a sliced pineapple and orange.


Gin and Tonic, Barcelona Style

The gin and tonic is the stiffest of British drinks, bracing, cool, and astringent. But like a London holiday-goer on a cheap fare to the Costa del Sol, England’s venerable old G&T has sought the warmth of Spain. The Spanish are now the biggest gin drinkers on the planet, per capita, and the gin and tonic (known as the “gin tonic”) has become the new taste of Madrid and Barcelona. As a nod to the summer travel season, we came up with our own Spanish gin tonic. The source of our inspiration: Spain’s Gin Mare, flavored with a whole bunch of Mediterranean aromatics (arbequina olives, rosemary, thyme). But, since we’re lazy, basically, and too cheap to buy a fancy Spanish spirit, we thought we’d approximate, using earthy-tasting Plymouth gin and adding our own aromatic elements to the basic G&T: rosemary, arbequina olives, caperberries, lemon, and a touch of sea salt. The fragrance is pretty explosive, capable of turning a drab San Francisco afternoon into a warm evening in La Barceloneta, with the clinking of ice cubes and a whiff of sea. As we’d say if we were Catalan, or just mildly drunk on a couple of these babies, salut!

Barcelona Gin and Tonic
Makes 1 cocktail

Ice
Lemon twist
Sprig of rosemary
Pinch of sea salt
1 caperberry
2 arbequina or other small, mild, aromatic olives
2 ounces Plymouth gin
4 ounces Indian tonic water such as Fever-Tree, chilled

Step 1: Place a highball or rocks glass in the freezer to chill.

Step 2: Fill the glass two-thirds with ice. Rub the lemon twist around the rim and drop it into the glass do the same with the rosemary sprig. Add a pinch of salt to the glass, and drop in the caperberry and olives.

Step 3: Add the gin and use a swizzle stick or spoon to stir. Pour over the tonic and serve.


To continue reading this post in Spanish click here. Para leer este post en Español haga click aqui.

We have a lot to share about Barcelona and this time we decided to reveal our secret places in Barcelona.

Yes, the hidden gems of Barcelona which you might not find in any traditional travel guide.

This post may contain affiliate links. We earn a small commission if you purchase something through the affiliate link.

Why we are sharing these places with you if they are secret?

We want to show you Barcelona from a different perspective. There is more than the classic touristic places like La Sagrada Familia, Parc Guell, Casa Milà – La Pedrera and Las Ramblas street.

Of course, when you are coming to Barcelona for the first time, you should first visit all traditional touristic places.

When you get to the point that you want to see something else without crowds of tourists, you are ready to visit these secret places in Barcelona.

Before we dive in and reveal all the secrets, we want to recommend you the best credit cards for your trip.

Our Tip: Revolut and Transferwise are great cards when you are travelling to a country with a different currency than yours. We use both cards during our trips and we never had problems even in remote places around the world.

Grab our Barcelona Travel Checklist and Let the adventure begin!

Let’s go back to our hidden gems of Barcelona and show you the best of this beautiful city from a local perspective.

1. Carmel Bunkers

If you want to see the whole city of Barcelona, this is a place for you. Carmel Bunkers is a really hidden gem as you can find them on the top of the hill Turó de la Rovira and not very close to Barcelona city centre. The best part about the Carmel Bunkers is an amazing 360º city view.

This place was originally used as antiaircraft warfare during the Spanish Civil War. You can still find some destroyed parts of bunkers with a short explanation about the history of this place.

Nowadays, it’s a great viewpoint and great secret place for a sunset, just beautiful!

2. Labyrinth Park Horta

Located on the North part of the city, Labyrinth Park of Horta is one of the hidden gems of Barcelona. This park is actually the oldest garden in Barcelona and it has a long history.

The best element of the park is the labyrinth, a series of tall hedges that link together in a maze formation. It is the best place to lose yourself in a real-life labyrinth and forget everything.

It is opened 7 days a week and there is a small admission fee of 2.17 EUR (2018 price).

3. Antic Theatre

Antic Theatre is totally hidden urban place located close to the popular Palau de la Música. The Theatre is attached to the stunning terrace where you can sit surrounded by the classic buildings of the old part of Barcelona.

It is a perfect secret place in Barcelona for refreshment in the summer far away from the city noise. Every time we visited this place, we found a great vibe so we totally recommend it!

Our tip: When we travel we always make sure to have travel insurance. Our personal recommendation is WORLD NOMADS as they have great support and health coverage around the world. And don’t worry if you forget about it, you can purchase the insurance during your trip!

4. Greek Theatre Gardens (Jardins del Teatre Grec)

Our next secret place of Barcelona is dedicated to Garden lovers. Greek Theatre Gardens are located in Montjuic Hill and they were built for the 1929 International Exhibition in Barcelona.

Nowadays, the place is used for the Grec Festival during the summer months. The rest of the year, the gardens and theatre are both opened to the public and it is a great hidden place for reading a book and escape from the city.

5.The Chocolate Museum (Museum de la Xocolate)

Our favourite hidden place in Barcelona especially if you love chocolate like us.

The Chocolate Museum is located in the historic part of the city and beside the fact that you can taste delicious chocolate, you can also discover the chocolate history and its origins in Europe.

This museum is actually one of the smallest museums in Barcelona and even if it is located in the city centre, it is a bit hidden from all touristic attractions.

Our recommendation, come here during the winter and get hot chocolate, it will change everything:).

This was our last recommendation for secret places in Barcelona and we hope that you find your spot to visit next time you are going to come here.

There are many other hidden gems of Barcelona, so feel free to share your secrets.

These five places are for us the ones we really love and visit every time we come to Barcelona (we moved away in 2018 but you never know:)).

Where to stay in Barcelona

We usually get many questions and recommendations about where to stay in Barcelona. We thought about the best answer for you however we realized that it is very individual as someone wants to stay close to the beach and someone close to the main square.

We decided to recommend some neighbourhoods which we feel are the best for your stay in Barcelona.

Let’s start with the Eixample neighbourhood where we lived for a few years. It is actually divided into two main subareas: Eixample Esquerra (left) and Eixample Dreta (right). We love this area as it is full of restaurants, bars, shopping areas and historic monuments. You can actually find the most popular attractions here such as Sagrada Familia or La Pedrera.

Find the best accommodation in Barcelona Eixample below on the map!

Our next recommendation for accommodation in Barcelona is the Barrio Gotico ( Gothic Quarter) area. It is a neighbourhood where you can lose yourself in the little streets and feel like in Medieval time. The famous attraction which we should mention is definitely Barcelona Catedral.

Don’t get confused about the Sagrada Familia and the Catedral of Barcelona. The Cathedral of Barcelona is located on Pla de la Seu square and it is dedicated to the Martyr Santa Eulalie, which is the co-patron saint of Barcelona with the Virgin of Mercy.

Most of the tourists know Sagrada Familia and sometimes it is called Catedral so that’s why we wanted to make it clear.

If you are fun of tiny streets with many small cafe shops everywhere, Barrio Gotico is the area for your accommodation.

Check the map below to find your accommodation with fancy Cathedral view.