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Bibb Lettuce Salad with Persimmons and Candied Pecans

Bibb Lettuce Salad with Persimmons and Candied Pecans

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup whole-berry cranberry sauce (purchased or homemade)
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon golden brown sugar
  • 6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 heads of Bibb lettuce, coarsely torn
  • 4 Fuyu persimmons, peeled, sliced
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter
  • 1 cup (generous) crumbled blue cheese
  • Candied Pecans (click for recipe)

Recipe Preparation

  • Whisk first 4 ingredients in medium bowl; whisk in oil. Season with salt and pepper.

  • Mound lettuce in center of 8 plates. Top each with persimmon slices, then drizzle with dressing. Sprinkle with cheese and Candied Pecans.

Recipe by Maureen C Petrosky,Photos by Charles SchillerReviews Section

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Recipe Summary

  • 5 peaches (not white)
  • 3 green onions, sliced
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 3 tablespoons honey
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon lime zest
  • ½ cup fresh lime juice
  • ¾ teaspoon ground cumin
  • ¾ teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 ½ tablespoons tequila (optional)
  • ⅓ cup olive oil
  • Vegetable cooking spray
  • 1 (6-oz.) package watercress or baby arugula, thoroughly washed
  • ¾ pound fresh mozzarella, cut into 16 (1/4-inch) slices
  • Garnish: fresh cilantro sprigs

Peel and chop 1 peach. Cut remaining 4 peaches into 28 (1/4-inch-thick) rounds, cutting through stem and bottom ends. (Cut peaches inward from sides, cutting each side just until you reach the pit. Discard pits.)

Process chopped peach, green onions, next 7 ingredients, and, if desired, tequila in a food processor 10 to 15 seconds or until smooth. Add oil, and pulse 3 to 4 times or until thoroughly combined.

Coat cold cooking grate of grill with cooking spray, and place on grill. Preheat grill to 350° to 400° (medium-high). Brush both sides of peach rounds with 1/3 cup peach dressing.

Grill peach rounds, covered with grill lid, over 350° to 400° (medium-high) heat 3 to 5 minutes on each side or until grill marks appear.

Arrange watercress evenly on 4 plates. Alternately layer 4 grilled peach rounds and 4 cheese slices over watercress on each plate. Top each with 3 more peach rounds. Drizzle with remaining peach dressing. Garnish, if desired.

Grilled Peach-and-Feta Salad: Preheat oven to 350°. Arrange 1/4 cup pecans, chopped, in a single layer in a shallow pan. Bake 8 to 10 minutes or until toasted and fragrant, stirring after 5 minutes. Reduce peaches from 5 to 4, and reduce salt to 1/2 tsp. Substitute 8 cups loosely packed Bibb lettuce leaves (about 6 oz. 1 to 2 heads of lettuce) for watercress and 1/4 cup crumbled feta cheese for mozzarella cheese. Peel and chop 1 peach. Cut each of remaining 3 peaches into 8 wedges. Proceed with recipe as directed in Steps 2 through 4, decreasing grilling time for peach wedges to 2 to 3 minutes on each side or until grill marks appear. Divide Bibb lettuce and 4 cooked bacon slices, halved crosswise, among 4 plates or shallow bowls. Top with grilled peach wedges. Sprinkle with feta cheese and pecans. Serve with dressing. Makes 4 servings Prep: 25 min., Bake: 10 min., Grill: 6 min.

Note: You can also use a grill pan to get those beautiful grill marks on the peaches.


WHAT MAKE THIS SALAD SO SPECIAL?

  • The lettuce is tender, sweet and buttery
  • The vinaigrette is bright and exciting with intense citrus flavors balanced by sweet honey.
  • I love making this salad for company. Although it&rsquos very simple and just greens, it has that special something. I always gets compliments and requests for the recipe.

I haven&rsquot said anything about the tarragon yet &ndash it&rsquos great! This anise flavored herb is the perfect punctuation mark for the bright and sweet flavors of citrus and honey.

This recipe is adapted from Avec Eric


For this recipe, you’ll have the best results if you make the lentils from scratch. You want them to still have some firmness. Al dente is best! With canned lentils, there’s no guarantee that they won’t be overly soft.

That being said, I have made this recipe several times using the vacuum packed steamed lentils from Trader Joe’s. (They’re one of my favorite Trader Joe’s vegan products.)

When doing this, I have replaced all of the lentils (including the French lentils du Puy) with a package of pre-cooked lentils. That makes this recipe incredibly weeknight friendly. The whole thing is ready to go in about fifteen minutes.

One thing to note is that the package of Trader Joe’s steamed lentils contains 2 ½ cups of cooked lentils, while the full recipe listed here requires 3 ½ cups of cooked lentils. So to easily follow the instructions, buy two packages. Or halve the recipe, and then use 1 ¾ cups of the pre-cooked lentils.


Growing Apples, Pears, Persimmons and Pomegranates

Apples, Pears, Persimmons and Pomegranates, n ature’s grand finale!

Jeff Raska, Dallas County Horticulture Program Assistant, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service inspired us to start planting, growing and harvesting the fruits of the season. For Raincatcher’s, it was our last and final class of 2018 in the series. With an abundance of fall fruits ripe and ready for harvest, we gathered up our pens and paper for a very educational presentation. Highlights from Jeff’s lecture included the following:

General Information for Fruit Trees

Your first consideration should be selecting the right variety for our climate and soils. Plant trees during dormancy, January to early February in a slightly raised mound rich in compost and top-dressed with mulch. Bare root trees are preferred as they will outgrow a container plant. Want to know if you have a healthy tree? Scratch the root. If it’s the color of cooked spaghetti, it’s a viable tree.

All fruit growth happens within the first 45 days of fruit set (after bloom). At that time, the plant needs constant water (1-3” per week). The fruit won’t get any bigger or sweeter after the first 45 days, it just develops the seed.

In terms of “chill hours,” our Zone 8b previously was between 600-950 hours. Currently we are between 600-800 hours. Our winters are getting colder but shorter due to climate change.

Apples and pears need a cross-pollinator…another tree that blooms at the same time. Both trees grow spurs, short and stout twigs that bear the fruit buds year after year. That’s one reason you can espalier the tree and have fruit on those limbs. This is in contrast to peaches that bear fruit on new growth every year.

The second consideration is pruning. As a ‘rule-of-thumb’, if you can’t see the fruit then you’re not getting enough sun. Thin the fruit when it’s the size of a nickel. The goal here is to have only 3-4 fruits per limb, spaced about 6 inches apart. Each flower will produce one fruit too many fruits on a limb will create smaller fruit and risk the branch breaking under the weight.

The third consideration is fertilizer. Instead of fertilizer, mix finished compost into your mound, then top-dress 1-2 times per year. Finished compost is homogenous. When you hold a fistful, there are no telltale leaves or twigs in it. If you do choose to fertilize or use chemicals, don’t use them before a rain event. Rain doesn’t wash the chemicals in, it washes them out. Mulch for weed control. Not only do weeds take nutrients away from the plants, they are a home for the insects that attack the plant.

Apples (Best varieties for the DFW metroplex, with chill hours)

Aim for a variety that has about 600 chill hours. A tree that has more, or less, will live but won’t bear fruit. When is the fruit ripe? Look for green that is starting to add color, or if a bird pecks at it. If you cut it open and find a black seed, it’s ripe. If the seed is green, it is not yet completely ripe.

(Best varieties for the DFW metroplex, with chill hours)

In addition to chill hours, these varieties are resistant to fire blight. *Bartlett is especially vulnerable to fire blight and strongly not recommended for this area. All the above varieties can cross pollinate with one another.

(Best varieties for the DFW metroplex)

The pomegranate is a part of the crepe myrtle family. It is a wild and unruly bush that needs to grow as a bush and fruits best when not pruned to grow as a tree. However, it can be trimmed to maintain an attractive form. It is self-fertile and doesn’t need another plant for cross-pollination. Pomegranates don’t ripen after being picked. Wait to pick until the fruit is ripe, it should give a little when you squeeze it gently.

(Best varieties for the DFW metroplex)

Eureka (a flat variety, less tannic and can be eaten when firm or soft)

Hachiya (this is the cone-shaped variety, very tannic and only edible when soft)

Based on the variety, persimmons can be self-fertile or need cross-pollination. Persimmon tree branches are thicker and can handle a heavy fruit load.

Immediately following Jeff’s presentation, members and guests were treated to bountiful buffet table bursting with seasonal flavor. It was a feast for both the eyes and the palate.

A few of the recipes that were developed for this special event will be posted tomorrow:

Baked Brie with Roasted Persimmons

Butternut Squash-Pear Soup garnished with Parmesan and Chopped Rosemary

Salad of Figs, Pomegranates, Persimmons and Pears with Pomegranate Dressing

written by Lisa Centala and Linda Alexander from Jeff Rasks’s presentation


We found at least 10 Websites Listing below when search with bibb lettuce salad ideas on Search Engine

10 Best Bibb Lettuce Salad Recipes Yummly

Yummly.com DA: 14 PA: 27 MOZ Rank: 41

Bibb Lettuce Salad with Vinegar-Roasted Beets Food and Wine rice wine vinegar, plain yogurt, pepper, kosher salt, water, shallot and 8 more Pan-Roasted Salmon with Bibb Lettuce Salad Today canola oil, chives, whole grain mustard, red onion, cider vinegar

Crisp Bibb Lettuce Salad Recipe

  • In a small bowl or measuring cup, whisk together the olive oil, Parmesan cheese, pepper, salt and fresh lime juice and set aside
  • Tear the lettuce into bite-sized pieces and rinse under cold water
  • Pat dry in a clean kitchen towel or spin them in a salad spinner until they are completely dry then add the leaves to a medium-sized salad

Bibb Lettuce with Shaken Vinaigrette Recipe Tyler

Foodnetwork.com DA: 19 PA: 50 MOZ Rank: 71

Combine the shallot, mustard, vinegar, oil, and salt and pepper in a jar and, with an immersion blender, pulse until the shallot is chopped and the vinaigrette …

Bibb Lettuce Salad recipe Epicurious.com

Epicurious.com DA: 18 PA: 45 MOZ Rank: 66

  • Place the leaves from a single head of lettuce in a bowl
  • Sprinkle with a pinch of salt, a few grinds of pepper, 1 1/2 teaspoons of the shallots and chives, and 1 …

10 Best Bibb Lettuce Salad Recipes Yummly

Yummly.co.uk DA: 16 PA: 27 MOZ Rank: 47

  • Sun-dried tomatoes, red wine vinegar, asiago cheese, green olives and 10 more
  • Sesame Tuna Salad Cooking at Sabrina's
  • Radishes, mache, cucumber, canola oil, yellow mustard seeds, cracked pepper and 25 …

10 Best Simple Lettuce Salad Recipes Yummly

Yummly.com DA: 14 PA: 29 MOZ Rank: 48

Overnight Lettuce Salad Corn, Beans, Pigs and Kids lettuce, Parmesan cheese, cauliflower, mayonnaise, bacon, sugar and 1 more Wilted Lettuce Salad The Country Contessa salt, pepper, bacon drippings, apple cider vinegar, onion tops and 5 …

Blooming Bibb Lettuce Salad Recipe

Foodandwine.com DA: 19 PA: 36 MOZ Rank: 61

  • Stack the lettuce leaves on 4 plates to form a flower shape, using the largest leaves on the bottom and the smallest on top
  • Drizzle with the dressing, distributing the tomatoes among the …

Bibb-Lettuce Salad With Blue Cheese, Pears and Walnuts

Nymag.com DA: 9 PA: 41 MOZ Rank: 57

  • Preheat the oven to 350 degrees
  • Mix the canola oil, cayenne pepper, and sugar in a bowl until smooth
  • Toss in the walnuts, and stir until they are coated
  • Spread the walnuts out on a cookie sheet

Bibb Lettuce Recipes & Menu Ideas Bon Appetit

Bonappetit.com DA: 18 PA: 24 MOZ Rank: 50

Find Bibb Lettuce ideas, recipes & cooking techniques for all levels from Bon Appétit, where food and culture meet.

Romaine Lettuce Salad Recipes Allrecipes

Allrecipes.com DA: 18 PA: 50 MOZ Rank: 77

  • Mandarin oranges add the color and the dressing adds the zing to this mixture of greens
  • You can use spinach or iceberg lettuce in place of romaine, or use a combination of any of them

Simple Butter Lettuce Salad The Modern Proper

  • Composed of tender butter lettuce leaves, briny green olives and salty slivers of aged manchego, our butter lettuce salad is a feast for the eyes and the palate
  • Simple Butter Lettuce Salad Crisp, refreshing, a little rich, a little savory, sweet and zippy, this gorgeous butter lettuce salad is all of the things and hits all of the spots.

Best Bibb Lettuce Recipes and Bibb Lettuce Cooking Ideas

  • Buy green leafy vegetables like arugula, watercress, and collards – they are good sources of vitamins A, C, and K and minerals like iron and calcium
  • Brighten up sandwiches or salads with small, tender leaves like spinach and add larger, tougher leaves like kale to soups and stews.

Bibb Lettuce Salad Rachael Ray Show

  • In a large serving bowl, combine the torn bibb lettuce leaves, radishes, cucumber and toasted pine nuts
  • In a separate small bowl combine the shallots, Dijon mustard, red wine vinegar, salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Slowly whisk in EVOO in a steady stream
  • Pour the dressing over the salad just before serving.

Boston Lettuce with Shaved Parmesan Martha Stewart

  • In a large bowl, combine lettuce with dressing and 3/4 cup cheese toss gently to coat
  • Divide among plates, and top with remaining 1/4 cup cheese.

95 Boston Bibb Lettuce Salad Recipes RecipeOfHealth.com

jasmine rice, water, salt, seasoned rice vinegar, vegetable oil, mayonnaise, soy sauce, chopped peeled fresh ginger (from a 2- by 3-inch piece), garlic cloves, chopped, asian sesame oil, grilled chicken breast halves, shredded (2 cups), lime vinaigrette (reserved from grilled chicken with shredded mesclun salad), boston or bibb lettuce, leaves separated, seedless cucumber (usually plastic


A to Z Food and Cooking Equivalents and Yields

Do you need to know how many teaspoons of dried herbs to substitute for fresh, how much fresh asparagus to use when the recipe calls for canned, how many graham crackers it takes to make 1 cup of crumbs, or how many apples to buy when a recipe calls for 1 cup of sliced apple?

Use this handy chart or food quantity equivalents and yields to help you convert or adjust foods for your favorite recipes. And use this chart if you need to convert liquid measurements.

meat for 4 to 5 sandwiches

2 cups cooked sliced/diced

1 1/2 to 1 3/4 cups shelled

3 1/2 to 4 1/2 cups shredded

2 1/2 to 3 cups cooked, diced

2 to 3 cups cooked, chopped

4 cups crumbled for stuffing

2 1/2 to 3 cups peeled, sliced/chopped

3 3/4 cups sifted or stirred

1 cup minus 2 tbsps. sifted all-purpose flour (7/8 cups)

thickens 3 to 4 cups fruit

thickens 2 to 4 cups juice

thickens 4 to 8 cups fruit

1/8 tsp. garlic powder plus 7/8 tsp. salt

1/2 tsp. dried crushed herbs

2 cups chopped or sliced (white part)

1 cup chopped, cooked (white part)

1 to 2 tsps. grated fresh lemon peel

grated peel of 1 medium lemon

equal to 1 lb. fresh when reconstituted

equal to 1 medium onion, chopped

4 tbsps. fresh chopped onion

equal to 1 cup chopped raw

1 1/2 to 2 tbsps. grated peel

2 to 3 tbsps. grated orange peel

grated peel of 1 medium orange

1 tbsp. fresh parsley, chopped

1/4 cup chopped fresh mint

extra colossal less than 10

1/4 cup chopped fresh mint

1/2 to 3/4 cups cooked squeezed dry

2/3 cup cooked squeezed dry

1 2/3 cups cooked and mashed

3 1/2 to 3 3/4 cups unsifted

4 cups stems + 5 to 6 cups leaves

1 1/2 cups cooked stems plus 1 cup cooked leaves

1 to 1 1/2 cups peeled, seeded, chopped

3 3/4 to 6 3/4 uncooked meat

2 1/2 to 3 cups cooked & mashed

Amounts can vary depending on food item size, peel, manufacturers' packing, etc.


Salads

Fresh corn, edamame, roasted bell peppers, green beans, avocado and cashews are paired with a slightly tangy dressing.

Total time: 1 hour Servings: 4 to 6 Note: Gorgonzola dolce is a sweeter type of Gorgonzola it is available at cheese stores as well as select gourmet stores and well-stocked markets.

Total time: 35 minutes Servings: Four as a starter two as a main course Anchovy dressing 5 anchovy fillets (preferably salt-packed), rinsed (backbones removed if salt-packed) 1 1/2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 1 tablespoon fresh-squeezed lemon juice, plus more to taste 1 large garlic clove, finely chopped 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more to taste 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus more to taste 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil In the bowl of a food processor or a blender, purée the anchovies, vinegar, lemon juice, garlic, salt and pepper.

Total time: 40 minutes Servings: 4 to 6 Note: Gorgonzola dolce is a sweeter type of Gorgonzola it is available at cheese stores as well as select gourmet stores and well-stocked markets.

Dear SOS: My wife and I had Chi Dynasty in Studio City recommended to us.

Farro salad with mushrooms, dill and feta Total time: 1 hour, 40 minutes Servings: 4 to 6 1 cup farro 3 cups water Salt 8 ounces mushrooms 1 tablespoon oil 1 clove garlic, minced 3 tablespoons chopped dill, divided 1/2 cup chopped toasted walnuts 1/3 cup chopped green onions 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar 1/3 cup slivered bottled red bell peppers 1/4 cup crumbled feta 1.

Bulgur salad with arugula, zucchini and pine nuts Total time: 1 hour, plus soaking time for the bulgur Servings: 6 to 8 1 cup fine bulgur wheat 1 1/2 cups water 3/4 pound zucchini Salt 1/4 cup minced red onion 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil Freshly ground black pepper 1 1/2 cups torn arugula leaves 1/4 cup toasted pine nuts 1.

Quinoa salad with grilled corn, tomatoes and cilantro Total time: 1 hour Servings: 6 to 8 1 cup quinoa 1 3/4 cups water Salt 2 cups grilled corn (from about 2 ears, cut from the cobs) 2 cups chopped tomatoes, or cherry tomatoes cut in half 1 serrano chile, seeded and minced 3/4 cup chopped green onion 3 tablespoons lime juice 2 tablespoons oil 1 clove garlic, minced 1 3/4 teaspoons ground cumin 1 1/2 cups chopped cilantro 1.

Panzanella with sherry vinaigrette Total time: 30 minutes Servings: 12 skewers Note: Adapted from “On a Stick!”

Vol-au-vents with pea shoots and herbed goat cheese Our recipes, your kitchen: If you try any of the L.A.

Dear SOS: I love the chicken salad from Lunch in Culver City.

Potato and shrimp salad with green goddess dressing Total time: About 1 hour and 20 minutes Servings: 6 Note: Reserve the trimmings from the green onions, parsley and tarragon from the dressing for use in the second part of the recipe.

Recipe: Watermelon with mint and lime

Total time: 40 minutes (plus 1 month if making homemade preserved lemons) Servings: 4 Note: Adapted from Travis Lett of Gjelina.

NOTE: Master Class columns are intended for ambitious home cooks, and some of the recipes may call for special ingredients or equipment.

This fresh salad served at Little Dom’s restaurant in Los Angeles has crisp, assertive notes.

Egg salad Total time: 10 minutes Servings: 4 to 6 Our recipes, your kitchen: If you try this or any other recipe from the L.A.

“A well-made potato salad is one of the most delicious side dishes you can have,” says Food editor Russ Parsons.

Chickpea salad with chorizo (Garbanzos aliñados con chorizo) Total time: 10 minutes, plus marinating time Servings: 6 tapas or 4 salad servings Note: Start this recipe a day or two before serving, as you’ll need to allow time to soak the chickpeas before cooking, then to marinate them in the oil and lemon dressing.

Broiled eggplant salad with sautéed onions, garlic and tomatoes Total time: 1 1/4 hours Servings: 4 Note: This delicious appetizer might be called a salad, spread or dip.

Focaccia is used for croutons in this recipe from PizzaVino in Sebastopol, Calif.

The curried slaw at Napa’s Mustards Grill restaurant is a simple recipe that pops with bold flavors.

Kale Caesar Total time: 30 minutes Servings: 4 to 6 Note: Adapted from “Tartine Bread” by Chad Robertson.

Fresh herb salad with seeds Total time: 25 minutes Servings: 4 1/2 cup fresh mint leaves 1 1/2 cups Italian parsley leaves 1 cup cilantro leaves 3/4 cup basil leaves, preferably purple basil, torn into pieces 4 cups chilled baby salad leaves 2-3 radishes, thinly sliced 3 tablespoons sunflower seeds 1 tablespoon sesame seeds 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil Juice of half lemon Juice of half orange 1 teaspoon honey 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar 1/4 teaspoon salt Black pepper to taste 1.

Dear SOS: I dined at American Fish in Las Vegas at the Aria hotel last weekend and enjoyed the best Caesar salad ever.

Sharon’s ambrosia Total time: 15 minutes Servings: 12 to 16 Note: From Sharon Rushing Our recipes, your kitchen: If you try any of the L.A.

Dear SOS: One of my favorite dishes at M Café de Chaya is the curried cauliflower salad.

Garden Corn and Tomato Salad Active Work and Total Preparation Time: 25 minutes * Vegetarian 5 ears corn 2 pounds tomatoes, diced 1 1/2 cups sliced green onions 1 cup chopped celery 1/4 cup chopped fresh basil 1/4 cup rice vinegar 1 teaspoon salt Lettuce leaves, for serving Bring a large pot of water to a boil.

Total time: 1 hour Servings: 4 to 6 Note: Adapted from “Please to the Table” by Anya von Bremzen. 1 boneless, skinless chicken breast Salt, pepper 1 large potato 1 medium carrot 2/3 cup green peas 1 medium red apple, cored and cut into 1/2 -inch dice 1 large dill pickle, cut into 1/2 -inch dice 2 hard-cooked eggs, cut into 1/2 -inch dice 2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill 1/2 cup mayonnaise 1/3 cup sour cream 1 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 1/2 teaspoon vinegar Grated zest of 1/2 lemon Freshly ground white pepper to taste Cherry or grape tomatoes for garnish 1.

Kuzina’s butterflied roasted eggplant salad Total time: 30 minutes, plus 2 hours steeping time for the aromatic olive oil Servings: 2 Note: The garlic olive oil and aromatic olive oil can be prepared up to 2 days in advance.

Quinoa lentil salad with tomatoes Total time: 50 minutes, plus cooling and chilling times Servings: 6 1 cup French green or brown lentils, sorted and rinsed Salt and pepper 1/4 cup white wine vinegar or cider vinegar, plus more for drizzling 1 cup quinoa, rinsed and strained 1/2 cup olive oil, plus more for drizzling 1 large garlic clove, minced 1/4 cup chopped fresh mint 1/4 cup fresh parsley 2 cups cherry or other little tomatoes, halved 1.

Potato salad with celery and red onion Total time: 45 minutes, plus cooling time Servings: 6 2 pounds waxy potatoes, unpeeled Salt 2 1/2 teaspoons shallots 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1/3 cup oil 1 cup chopped celery (about 4 stalks) 1/3 cup diced red onion 3 tablespoons coarsely chopped parsley 1.

A recipe from Fig Restaurant in Santa Monica.

Spring herb salad Total time: 25 minutes Servings: 4 3 heaping cups spring lettuces, ideally a mix of coarsely torn Bibb, mache and watercress leaves 1 1/2 cups coarsely chopped mixed herbs: chives, mint, chervil, tarragon, dill 1/2 cup cooked, shelled edamame 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon sherry vinegar Pinch coarse sea salt 2 tablespoons very peppery olive oil Freshly ground white pepper to taste 1.

Spring herb salad with warm blue cheese Total time: About 30 minutes Servings: 4 Note: Use Fourme d’Ambert, Bleu d’Auvergne or another creamy but firm blue cheese.

Celery salad with pig ear, bacon and walnuts Total time: 1 hour, plus braising and chilling times Servings: 6 Note: Pig ears can be found at Chinese and select general Asian markets.

Alder-smoked scallops with fennel salad Total time: 45 minutes Servings: 4 Note: When buying scallops, look for “diver” or “dry-packed” scallops these scallops are fresh with no added liquid, and their flavor is noticeably sweeter.

Dear SOS: The Loews Madison Hotel in Washington, D.C., has a wonderful seafood salad on its dining room menu.

Grilled romaine with walnuts, Parmesan and anchovy dressing Total time: 30 minutes Servings: 6 4 anchovy fillets 2 teaspoons minced garlic 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup olive oil 3 teaspoons lemon juice 3 (6-ounce) hearts of romaine 2/3 cup chopped, toasted walnuts 1 ounce Parmigiano-Reggiano 1.

Total time: 25 minutes Servings: 2 as a main course, 4 as a side Note: This dressing is tart sweet, making the salad a nice start to a post-Thanksgiving meal.

Total Time: 25 minutes Servings: 4 Note: From Donna Deane. 1/2 cup rice vinegar 1/2 cup cranberry juice 1/4 cup minced dried cranberries 1 tablespoon minced shallot 2 teaspoons sugar 1/2 teaspoon chopped fresh rosemary 2 teaspoons olive oil Salt Cracked pepper 1 pear 1 apple 1 lemon, cut in half 1 endive, sliced crosswise 5 cups mixed salad greens 1/4 cup toasted walnuts, coarsely chopped 1.

Dear SOS: Cole’s at 6th and Main streets in historic downtown makes a fantastic bacon potato salad.

Total time: 15 minutes plus wilting time for the vegetables and chilling time for the salad Servings: 8 Note: Adapted from Got Kosher?

Total time: About 1 hour Servings: 8 Note: Adapted from Got Kosher?

Total time: 50 minutes Servings: 4 1/4 pound zucchini, cut in 1/2 -inch dice 1 1/2 teaspoons salt, divided, plus more to taste 1 cup lentils 3 tablespoons finely chopped chives 1 clove garlic, minced 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus more as needed 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus more to taste 1/2 pound cherry tomatoes, cut in half Juice of 1/2 lemon 1/2 cup torn arugula leaves 2 tablespoons toasted pine nuts 1.

Tomato and white bean salad Total time: 45 minutes Servings: 6 Note: Add a drained can of good-quality tuna and this becomes a light summer supper. 1 1/4 pounds mixed miniature tomatoes 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons minced garlic 2 tablespoons capers 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar 1/4 cup diced red onion 1 (15-ounce) can cannellini beans 1/4 cup whole flat-leaf parsley leaves 1.

Total time: 1 hour, 15 minutes Servings: 4 to 6 Note: This looks best with tomatoes of different colors. 2 shallots, sliced moderately thin 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar 1 tablespoon minced garlic 1/2 cup olive oil, divided 1/4 pound fresh goat cheese 3 tablespoons minced chives (about 1 bunch) 1 baguette (about 3/4 pound) 1 1/4 pounds tomatoes, sliced into 1/4- to 1/2-inch thick rounds Salt Freshly ground pepper 1.

Total time: 30 minutes plus 20 minutes soaking time Servings: 6 to 8 2 ears corn 1/2 clove garlic 1/3 cup finely diced red onion 1/2 pound red and yellow miniature tomatoes, cut in half 4 teaspoons lemon juice 1/4 cup olive oil 3/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 pound arugula 1 ounce Parmigiano-Reggiano 1.

Total time: 30 minutes Servings: 6 Note: Use the best-tasting tomatoes you can find, whether they’re heirlooms, cherry tomatoes or any other type. 1/3 pound stale ciabatta, or other artisan-style bread 1 pound tomatoes 1 teaspoon salt Freshly ground black pepper 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar 1/2 cup olive oil 3/4 cup diced red onion 3 tablespoons toasted pine nuts 3 ounces arugula (about 5 or 6 good handfuls) 1.

Total time: 20 minutes Servings: 4 Note: Adapted from “Moro East” by Sam and Sam Clark.

Dear SOS: My husband and I recently went to Lake Arrowhead resort and had a great Caesar salad at Bin 189.

Total time: 35 minutes plus chilling time Servings: 6 to 8 6 large bell peppers, assorted colors 2 ears corn, shucked Juice of 2 lemons, or to taste Zest of 1 lemon 1 clove garlic, minced 1/4 cup olive oil 1 tablespoon agave syrup or honey, or to taste 1 teaspoon salt, or to taste 1/2 teaspoon chipotle or New Mexico chile powder, or to taste 1/4 cup chopped cilantro 1.

Total time: 25 minutes Servings: 6 to 8 2 pounds zucchini (about 6 small or 3 to 4 medium) 4 plum tomatoes, seeded and diced into 1/4 -inch pieces 1 teaspoon minced garlic 1/4 cup sherry vinegar, or to taste 2 tablespoons best-quality olive oil, or to taste 1/2 teaspoon salt, or to taste 1/4 teaspoon pepper, or to taste 8 large basil leaves thinly sliced 1/2 cup toasted pine nuts Shaved Parmigiano-Reggiano for garnish 1.

Total time: 20 minutes plus chilling time Servings: 8 to 10 3 1/2 pounds daikon radish, about 1 large 1 red onion, sliced lengthwise into 1/8 -inch strips 2 pounds cut snow peas, cut crosswise into 1-inch pieces 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons sesame oil, or to taste 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons rice vinegar, or to taste 2 teaspoons sugar, or to taste 2 teaspoons salt, or to taste 2 tablespoons black sesame seeds 1.

Total time: 20 minutes Servings: 6 to 8 Note: Buy a very firm, under-ripe cantaloupe this will make it easier to julienne the melon for the slaw.

Dear SOS: I’ve recently fallen in love with beet salads of all kinds, but this beet/horseradish antipasti from Pizzeria Mozza takes the cake.

Total time: 20 minutes, plus soaking and cooling time Servings: 4 Note: Adapted from Shaun Murphy from the book “From the Dining Car” by James D.

Total time: 15 minutes, plus chilling time for the salad Servings: 6 Note: Adapted from “The Prudence Penny Regional Cookbook” edited by Ruth Berolzheimer. 2 tablespoons lemon juice, plus more to taste 3 tablespoons mayonnaise 3 tablespoons sour cream 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 cups chopped roasted chicken, cut into 1/2 -inch pieces 1/2 cup diced tart apple (such as Granny Smith), plus 1 apple for garnish 1/2 cup canned sliced black olives, drained 1/2 cup diced celery 1.

Total time: 45 minutes, plus cooling time for the quinoa Servings: 6 Note:Umeboshi (plum) vinegar can be found at Whole Foods markets and Asian markets. 2 teaspoons umeboshi vinegar 1 teaspoon lemon juice 2 tablespoons dill pickle juice 1 tablespoon best-quality olive oil In a medium bowl, whisk together the vinegar, lemon juice, pickle juice and olive oil.

Total time: 1 hour and 10 minutes plus chilling time for the salad Servings: 6 to 8 Note: Adapted from “The Hip Chick’s Guide to Macrobiotics” by Jessica Porter.

Total time: 35 minutes Servings: 2 Note: Fava beans are available at select Whole Foods and through West Central Produce.

Uncooked farro is available at some specialty markets.

Time: 1 hour Servings: 12 Note: This corn relish is served with skirt steak at the Border Grill restaurants.

Dear SOS: La Grande Orange Café in the historic Santa Fe train depot in Pasadena has the most incredible Brussels sprout salad.

Total time: 30 minutes, plus shelling and hulling time Servings: 4 8 baby artichokes Juice of 2 lemons plus 2 tablespoons, divided Salt 1 1/2 cups shelled and hulled fava beans Freshly ground black pepper to taste 1/4 cup top-quality extra virgin olive oil 6 ounces pea shoots (about 7 cups) 2 ounces shaved pecorino Romano 1.

Total time: 1 hour, 40 minutes (including roasting time) Servings: 2 Note: Adapted from chef Corina Weibel of Canelé.

Total time: 30 minutes Servings: 6 4 cloves garlic 2 tablespoons dried oregano 2 teaspoons kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons lemon juice, or juice of 1 lemon 1/4 cup good red wine vinegar 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 1.

Dear SOS: I had lunch at the Restaurant at the Getty Center recently and had the most amazing Cobb salad that I have had in a long time.

Total time: 25 minutes Servings: 8 1 cup pecans 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided Salt 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons sherry vinegar 4 teaspoons Dijon mustard 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano Freshly ground black pepper 1 prepared rotisserie chicken, warm or at room temperature 9 cups loosely packed spinach 6 cups arugula 3 cups torn dandelion greens 1/2 red onion, sliced lengthwise into very thin strips 1 cup brined olives, such as niçoise or kalamata 1/3 cup capers 1/2 pound fresh goat cheese 1.

Total time: 40 minutes Servings: 4 to 6 Note: This recipe calls for a wok.

Total time: 50 minutes Servings: 6 Note: Fresh burrata is available at specialty food markets and cheese stores.

Total time: 30 minutes Servings: 6 Note: Adapted from a recipe by Jeremy Jackson. 8 ounces thick-cut bacon, cut crosswise into 1/2 -inch pieces 1 large (or 2 regular) fennel bulb, cored and thinly sliced, plus 2 tablespoons minced fronds, divided 2 garlic cloves, minced 2 cans (14.5 ounces each) white beans, drained 2 teaspoons lemon juice Zest of 1 medium lemon 1/4 teaspoon cumin 2 teaspoons best-quality olive oil Tabasco, or other vinegar-based hot sauce, to taste Salt Freshly ground black pepper 1.

Grilled fig salad Total time: 40 minutes Servings: 4 Note: From test kitchen manager Noelle Carter 1/3 cup walnut halves Salt Best-quality olive oil 2 tablespoons minced shallots 1/2 teaspoon chopped thyme 1/4 teaspoon chopped rosemary 3 tablespoons sherry vinegar 6 tablespoons best-quality olive oil Freshly ground black pepper 8 ripe figs 1 head radicchio 1 large head fennel 4 ounces fresh goat cheese (one small log) 1.

Total time: 25 minutes Servings: 4 to 6 Note: From Donna Deane 1 cup (loosely packed) shredded red cabbage 3 cups (loosely packed) shredded green cabbage 3 cups (loosely packed) shredded savoy cabbage 1/2 cup green pepper, cut into small dice 1/4 cup chopped green onion 1 tablespoon finely chopped cilantro 1 tablespoon chopped tarragon leaves 3 tablespoons best-quality olive oil 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar 1 teaspoon lemon juice 1 teaspoon sugar 1/2 teaspoon salt Cracked black pepper 1.

Total time: 40 minutes Servings: 6 Note: From “The Greens Cookbook.”

Total time: 1 hour Servings: 8 Note: Adapted from “Jamie at Home: Cook Your Way to the Good Life” by Jamie Oliver. 1 pound medium carrots, assorted colors, with a quarter inch of the leafy tops 2 teaspoons whole cumin seeds 1 or 2 small dried chiles, crumbled Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 cloves garlic, peeled 4 sprigs thyme, leaves picked Best-quality olive oil Red wine vinegar 1 orange, halved 1 lemon, halved 3 ripe avocados 4 ( 1/2 -inch) slices of ciabatta or other good quality bread 2 handfuls colorful mixed salad leaves, such as Treviso, arugula or radicchio 2 bunches watercress 2/3 cup sour cream, optional 4 tablespoons mixed seeds, toasted 1.

Total time: 1 hour, 20 minutes Servings: 6 Note: Adapted from “The Book of New Israeli Food” by Janna Gur.

Total time: 15 minutes Servings: 6 to 8 Note: King trumpet mushrooms are generally available at Asian markets. 3/4 pound king trumpet mushrooms Salt 1/2 teaspoon finely minced garlic Pinch dried red pepper flakes 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1/4 cup olive oil 10 cups arugula, loosely packed, about 8 ounces 1 ounce Parmigiano- Reggiano 3 tablespoons toasted pine nuts 1.

Total time: About 1 hour Servings: 4 Note: Black tomatoes can be found at farmers markets (Jaime Farms) and select grocery stores you can substitute other medium heirloom or on-the-vine tomatoes. 1/4 cup good-quality olive oil, plus extra for drizzling 4 cups country white bread, preferably stale, cut into ¼-inch cubes Sea salt 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 small red chile, minced 4 medium black tomatoes, coarsely chopped 1 1/4 cups halved grape and/or cherry tomatoes, assorted colors 1/2 cup finely diced red onion 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar Pinch of freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon coarsely chopped oregano 1/4 cup coarsely chopped basil 1/4 cup coarsely chopped parsley 1 cup watercress 1.

Total time:1 1/2 hours Servings: 8 to 10 Note: When looking for Tuscan kale, keep in mind that it goes by many names -- lacinato, dinosaur kale and black cabbage among them.

Total time: About 1 hour, 15 minutes, plus cooling time for the vegetables Servings: 8 to 10 10 cups cubed pumpkin (peeled and seeded), cut into 1-inch pieces (from about 7 pounds of pumpkin) 3 cups red pearl onions, peeled and trimmed 6 tablespoons olive oil, divided 1 1/8 teaspoons salt, divided Freshly ground black pepper 3/4 teaspoon minced rosemary 1 teaspoon minced thyme 6 slices bacon, cut crosswise into 1/4 -inch strips 1 medium leek, trimmed (root end and tough outer greens), halved lengthwise and cut crosswise into 1/4 -inch strips 1 teaspoon minced garlic 1/4 cup dry white wine 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1/2 cup walnut oil 1 cup walnut halves 2 heads frisée, leaves separated from the root 6 cups lightly packed mesclun mix or mixed greens 1.

Total time: About 1 hour Servings: 8 Note: This recipe requires three-fourths cup bacon grease, probably more than you’ll render when cooking the bacon below.

Total time: 15 minutes Servings: 8 as an appetizer or side dish Note: Adapted from “Beyond the Great Wall.”

Total time: 15 minutes, plus chilling time Servings: 6 to 8 2 cups cooked, drained black beans (canned are fine, just rinse off the salt) 2 tablespoons minced white onion 3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro 3 tablespoons fresh lime juice 5 tablespoons best-quality olive oil 1 teaspoon ground cumin Salt Freshly ground black pepper 1 red bell pepper, roasted, peeled, seeded and cut into about 1/2 -inch dice 1 cup diced hearts of palm 1 cup grape tomatoes, quartered lengthwise 1 medium ripe Hass avocado, peeled, seeded and diced 1.

Total time: 15 minutes, plus marinating time Servings: 6 Note: From test kitchen director Donna Deane.

Total time: 35 minutes, plus marinating time Servings: 2 Note: From Gingergrass in Silver Lake.

Total time: About 20 minutes Servings: 6 to 8 2 bunches young, tender spinach, stems removed 1 medium papaya 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar 1 tablespoon roughly chopped shallot 1 tablespoon sugar 1 teaspoon dry mustard 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 1/4 cup peanut or canola oil Salt to taste 1/2 cup coarsely chopped salted cashews 1.

Total time: 1 hour, plus 2 1/2 to 3 hours roasting time for the oven-dried tomatoes Servings: 8 as an appetizer or 4 as a main dish Note: Adapted from a recipe by Eric Greenspan, chef-owner of the Foundry on Melrose.

Total time: 1 hour, 10 minutes Servings: 4 Note: Mâche can be found at Whole Foods, Trader Joe’s, farmers markets and well-stocked supermarkets. 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided 1 medium onion, finely chopped (about 2/3 cup) 1 clove garlic, minced Scant 1 cup (6 ounces) dried black-eyed peas 1 small dried bay leaf 2 small sprigs fresh thyme Salt 6 ounces bacon, preferably apple wood-smoked, cut crosswise into strips about 1 inch by 1/4 inch 1 large bunch mustard greens, washed, stems removed and very roughly cut (about 12 cups loosely packed) 2 tablespoons sherry vinegar, preferably aged 4 slices of good-quality country white bread 2 cups mâche 1.

Total time: About 45 minutes Servings: 4 1/3 cup sliced almonds Salt 1 1/2 cups shelled fava beans (from about 1 1/2 pounds fresh pods) 1/2 cup long-grain rice, preferably basmati or jasmine 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon tarragon vinegar 3 tablespoons peanut or canola oil 2 teaspoons chopped chives 1 teaspoon finely chopped chervil 1 teaspoon finely chopped flat-leaf parsley 1 teaspoon finely chopped tarragon Freshly ground black pepper to taste 1/4 cup finely diced red pepper 1/4 cup finely diced fennel 1.

Total time: 45 minutes Servings: 12 Note: From Judy Rodgers.

Total time: About 45 minutes Servings: 4 Note: From Times test kitchen director Donna Deane 1 pound fresh fava beans, shelled 2 tablespoons cubed pecorino Romano ( 1/4-inch cubes) 4 1/2 tablespoons best-quality olive oil, divided 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice 1 teaspoon chopped parsley 1/8 teaspoon salt Cracked black pepper 1 small clove garlic, minced 1 small head (about 1/2 pound) romaine lettuce, quartered lengthwise 1.

Total time: 30 minutes Servings: 4 Note: From Cyndy Ufkes of the Times Test Kitchen.


Ask a Sommelier: How to Pair Wine With Salads

When it comes to wine pairing, salads can be tricky: a salad that's dressed with something tart can knock out the flavor of the wine you're trying to enjoy. We asked a few sommeliers from around the country for their tips on the best wines to serve with salads, and all the factors to consider when pairing. Here's what they had to say.

"Wines with an herbaceous or vegetal component work nicely with salad, whether it be a Sauvignon Blanc from the Loire Valley (all that fresh parsley and cut bell pepper) or a Gruner Veltliner from Austria (pea shoots and parsnips, anyone?). The main concern here is making sure that the acid in the wine meets or exceeds the acidity in the salad dressing you might think that a tart wine with a tart vinaigrette would be overwhelmingly, well, tart, but together those two high acid components will wash each other out, and you'll be left with a clean palate, ready to experience the more immediate flavors in the salad. You also want to match the weight in your dressing to the weight of the wine: a salad with a creamier dressing might want a wine with the creaminess of oak treatment. And finally, don't be afraid of a little residual sugar if there are sweeter elements in the salad (whether it be a honey vinaigrette, candied nuts, or fresh fruit). To my mind, one of the greatest salad pairings of all time is a classic Waldorf salad with François Cazin Cour-Cheverny Cuvée Renaissance (the off-dry bottling he makes in exceptional years—if that wine is out of reach, then a good Vouvray Sec or Demi-Sec from a producer like Domaine Huet, Philippe Foreau, or François Chidaine will do just fine!)."—Mia Van De Water (North End Grill)

"Gruner, gruner, gruner! This is my go-to salad wine if we're talking greens, vinaigrette, and veggie-heavy salads. The savory, green tones with celeriac and white pepper notes of a classic gruner are a perfect match for a salad. It enhances all farm-fresh flavors of the a great salad and brings brightness to the finish. Gruner also generally has enough weight on the palate to go with salad that have proteins. There's enough ripeness to balance out a grilled chicken or egg preparation, as well as acidity if you like salmon or blue cheese with your salad. Other great wines that have lovely, fresh green tones that work well with salads: Sancerre, Chablis, Arneis, and even a Blanc de Blancs Champagne."—June Rodil (Qui)

"Salads can be real wine killers: a wine with medium acidity suddenly becomes flabby in the face of zippy salad dressing because vinegar is infinitely more tart than any of the acids that turn up naturally in wine. There are two ways to deal with this issue. The first is to select wines that bite back. Brighter styles of wine (read: higher acidity) will hold their own next to the sourness of, for instance, lemon juice or vinegar. Some wines to consider in this category include: Txakolina (traditionally lean white wine from northern Spain), Muscadet (based on the snappy Melon de Bourgogne grape of the western Loire Valley in France), and Picpoul de Pinet (a white from the Languedoc region of Southern France). Picpoul translates roughly to 'lip stinger,' a nickname referring to its naturally high acidity. Red wines with suitable acidity are harder to come by, but a rose or sparkling rose could do the trick. The other way to address the issue of pairing salads with wine is to make a salad dressing with slightly lower acidity by substituting something like a lower acid citrus (tangerine or Valencia orange, perhaps) or verjus (the juice of underripe grapes). Grapes like grapes, so the verjus is a fun alternative for your next vinaigrette."—Lulu McAllister (Nopa)

"The variety that always comes to the rescue is Riesling. Riesling has high acid to match dressings but a few grams of sugar can go a long way to making the dish more complete. The last few months I have been drinking a lot of Riesling from Karthauserhof, Weiser-Kunstler and Peter Lauer."—Eric Railsback (Les Marchands)

"When it comes to challenging pairings like kale or asparagus or artichokes, a simple way to think about wines is to think: if I were cooking these vegetables, what would I add? I use lemon and salt, so for asparagus, artichokes, kale, I tend to lean to wines that have that citrus and salinity: briney seaside wines like Pigatos from Liguria, or Sardinian Vermentinos, Muscadet or a sharp, acidic, and dry riesling (and yes, of course. gruner veltliner). It's fun, also, to play with smoke (not fire): smoky volcanic wines like a great Fiano or Greco di Tufo can add a lot of texture and depth to a salad, especially with a peppery green like arugula, or a salad with a blue cheese or citrus. That same citrus salad is also fun to pair with a light red like a Freisa from Piemonte: the acidity is already there from the oranges, and then you add the fresh earthier berry that you find in the wine, reminds me almost of a great sangria."—Ceri Smith (Biondivino and Tosca)

"Tart wines are best with salads, since you're often dealing with vinegar and mustard in dressing. You can pretty much pop any white or rosé from the Loire Valley: it's called Le Jardin du France for good reason. Pépière's Muscadet or Trotereau's Quincy are perfect salad wines. Many Italian whites have a subtle neutrality that endears them to vegetables. Pigato (Vermentino) from Liguria has a tight white pepper kick to it that makes it pop with salad. I especially love Punta Crena's Vermentino. Rosé is the other great salad wine, since it mutes the pungency of garlic-forward dressings and finishes clean. One of my favorite combos is Commanderie de Peyrassol rosé and spinach salad with olives, egg and a dijon vinaigrette."—Jackson Rohrbaugh (Aragona)

"White wines are an easy go-to with salad, but I think that is only half of the story. I think higher acid red wines make tremendous salad pairings and for this I look to Italy. Start with kale and balsamic. Throw in some pepper, cranberries, walnuts, and maybe a Pecorino cheese and that sounds like a meal worthy of a Piemontese Barbera d'Alba by E. Pira e Figili. These wines have a tremendous freshness to them, yet with the heartiness of the cheese and the walnuts, the tannic properties of Barbera will have met their foil. Given the old adage 'acid loves acid,' the balsamic dressing will marry perfectly with this higher acid red grape. If the kale were to be swapped out for a less hearty green, such as romaine or mache, one might be tempted to seek out a white wine, but something with high mineral and high acid. I would stay in a Mediterranean country and head to Roussillon, France to enjoy Thomas Tiebert's Domaine de l'Horizon "Patriot" 2011. This German living in Catalunya makes this cuvee from Macabeu and Muscat to satisfy his yearning for the super-crisp mineral, yet floral whites he misses from the Mosel. For this pairing I would swap out a classic dark balsamic vinegar for a white balsamic, which brings the same sweet/sour combo we all love, but with a slightly more neutral flavor profile more befitting a white wine pairing."—Caleb Ganzer (Eleven Madison Park)

"With a super acidic dressing, I would choose a fuller white perhaps a Chardonnay with some oak aging. If it's a super creamy dressing, I would choose a leaner white with more acid like a dry Riesling or a white from Northern Italy. Then again, if you have a steak or chicken salad, you can go with a light-bodied red, like a Beaujolais, or Arbois from France."—Jessica Brown (The John Dory and The Breslin)