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Can Spicy Food Kill You?

Can Spicy Food Kill You?

Theoretically, those chile peppers can mean death

After that "killer" curry-eating contest that sent two contestants to the hospital, we've been wary of trying any peppers too spicy. MSNBC must have felt the same; they asked horticulture expert Paul Bosland whether spice can kill.

The answer? Theoretically, yes. Physically? Probably not.

"A research study in 1980 calculated that three pounds of extreme chiles in powder form — of something like the Bhut Jolokia — eaten all at once could kill a 150-pound person," Bosland told MSNBC. Luckily, your body will stop you via tissue inflamation, heart burns, and extreme pain before you reach that level.

So if you're feeling a little adventurous, check out our guide to chiles. But be careful.

The Daily Byte is a regular column dedicated to covering interesting food news and trends across the country. Click here for previous columns.


4 Effective Remedies To Cool Your Mouth After Eating Spicy Food

Highlights

4pm hunger pangs demand a bite of something delicious. Our dreams were recently answered when a local food stall outside the office started serving up a variety of momos. The best dish on his menu, arguably, is a plate of momos doused in a lip-smacking but mind-numbingly hot chilli sauce. The momos are so good that we can not help ordering them. These delicacies taste amazing but the after-taste they leave is almost like fire-in-the-mouth. The spice that you feel is the capsaicin, the active ingredient that binds to a special class of vanilloid receptor inside our mouth called VR1 receptors. After capsaicin binds to these receptors, the sensory neuron is depolarised, and it sends along a signal indicating the presence of spicy stimuli. Thanks heaven, we have ways to douse this fire and relieve our mouth. If your spice-tolerance levels are low like mine, this article is a lifesaver. Bookmark it, now.

Home remedies for spicy food: The spice that you feel is the capsaicin, the active ingredient​

Home remedies for spicy food: This loss of sensation in the mouth may lead you to believe otherwise​

Immediate steps to take


4 Effective Remedies To Cool Your Mouth After Eating Spicy Food

Highlights

4pm hunger pangs demand a bite of something delicious. Our dreams were recently answered when a local food stall outside the office started serving up a variety of momos. The best dish on his menu, arguably, is a plate of momos doused in a lip-smacking but mind-numbingly hot chilli sauce. The momos are so good that we can not help ordering them. These delicacies taste amazing but the after-taste they leave is almost like fire-in-the-mouth. The spice that you feel is the capsaicin, the active ingredient that binds to a special class of vanilloid receptor inside our mouth called VR1 receptors. After capsaicin binds to these receptors, the sensory neuron is depolarised, and it sends along a signal indicating the presence of spicy stimuli. Thanks heaven, we have ways to douse this fire and relieve our mouth. If your spice-tolerance levels are low like mine, this article is a lifesaver. Bookmark it, now.

Home remedies for spicy food: The spice that you feel is the capsaicin, the active ingredient​

Home remedies for spicy food: This loss of sensation in the mouth may lead you to believe otherwise​

Immediate steps to take


4 Effective Remedies To Cool Your Mouth After Eating Spicy Food

Highlights

4pm hunger pangs demand a bite of something delicious. Our dreams were recently answered when a local food stall outside the office started serving up a variety of momos. The best dish on his menu, arguably, is a plate of momos doused in a lip-smacking but mind-numbingly hot chilli sauce. The momos are so good that we can not help ordering them. These delicacies taste amazing but the after-taste they leave is almost like fire-in-the-mouth. The spice that you feel is the capsaicin, the active ingredient that binds to a special class of vanilloid receptor inside our mouth called VR1 receptors. After capsaicin binds to these receptors, the sensory neuron is depolarised, and it sends along a signal indicating the presence of spicy stimuli. Thanks heaven, we have ways to douse this fire and relieve our mouth. If your spice-tolerance levels are low like mine, this article is a lifesaver. Bookmark it, now.

Home remedies for spicy food: The spice that you feel is the capsaicin, the active ingredient​

Home remedies for spicy food: This loss of sensation in the mouth may lead you to believe otherwise​

Immediate steps to take


4 Effective Remedies To Cool Your Mouth After Eating Spicy Food

Highlights

4pm hunger pangs demand a bite of something delicious. Our dreams were recently answered when a local food stall outside the office started serving up a variety of momos. The best dish on his menu, arguably, is a plate of momos doused in a lip-smacking but mind-numbingly hot chilli sauce. The momos are so good that we can not help ordering them. These delicacies taste amazing but the after-taste they leave is almost like fire-in-the-mouth. The spice that you feel is the capsaicin, the active ingredient that binds to a special class of vanilloid receptor inside our mouth called VR1 receptors. After capsaicin binds to these receptors, the sensory neuron is depolarised, and it sends along a signal indicating the presence of spicy stimuli. Thanks heaven, we have ways to douse this fire and relieve our mouth. If your spice-tolerance levels are low like mine, this article is a lifesaver. Bookmark it, now.

Home remedies for spicy food: The spice that you feel is the capsaicin, the active ingredient​

Home remedies for spicy food: This loss of sensation in the mouth may lead you to believe otherwise​

Immediate steps to take


4 Effective Remedies To Cool Your Mouth After Eating Spicy Food

Highlights

4pm hunger pangs demand a bite of something delicious. Our dreams were recently answered when a local food stall outside the office started serving up a variety of momos. The best dish on his menu, arguably, is a plate of momos doused in a lip-smacking but mind-numbingly hot chilli sauce. The momos are so good that we can not help ordering them. These delicacies taste amazing but the after-taste they leave is almost like fire-in-the-mouth. The spice that you feel is the capsaicin, the active ingredient that binds to a special class of vanilloid receptor inside our mouth called VR1 receptors. After capsaicin binds to these receptors, the sensory neuron is depolarised, and it sends along a signal indicating the presence of spicy stimuli. Thanks heaven, we have ways to douse this fire and relieve our mouth. If your spice-tolerance levels are low like mine, this article is a lifesaver. Bookmark it, now.

Home remedies for spicy food: The spice that you feel is the capsaicin, the active ingredient​

Home remedies for spicy food: This loss of sensation in the mouth may lead you to believe otherwise​

Immediate steps to take


4 Effective Remedies To Cool Your Mouth After Eating Spicy Food

Highlights

4pm hunger pangs demand a bite of something delicious. Our dreams were recently answered when a local food stall outside the office started serving up a variety of momos. The best dish on his menu, arguably, is a plate of momos doused in a lip-smacking but mind-numbingly hot chilli sauce. The momos are so good that we can not help ordering them. These delicacies taste amazing but the after-taste they leave is almost like fire-in-the-mouth. The spice that you feel is the capsaicin, the active ingredient that binds to a special class of vanilloid receptor inside our mouth called VR1 receptors. After capsaicin binds to these receptors, the sensory neuron is depolarised, and it sends along a signal indicating the presence of spicy stimuli. Thanks heaven, we have ways to douse this fire and relieve our mouth. If your spice-tolerance levels are low like mine, this article is a lifesaver. Bookmark it, now.

Home remedies for spicy food: The spice that you feel is the capsaicin, the active ingredient​

Home remedies for spicy food: This loss of sensation in the mouth may lead you to believe otherwise​

Immediate steps to take


4 Effective Remedies To Cool Your Mouth After Eating Spicy Food

Highlights

4pm hunger pangs demand a bite of something delicious. Our dreams were recently answered when a local food stall outside the office started serving up a variety of momos. The best dish on his menu, arguably, is a plate of momos doused in a lip-smacking but mind-numbingly hot chilli sauce. The momos are so good that we can not help ordering them. These delicacies taste amazing but the after-taste they leave is almost like fire-in-the-mouth. The spice that you feel is the capsaicin, the active ingredient that binds to a special class of vanilloid receptor inside our mouth called VR1 receptors. After capsaicin binds to these receptors, the sensory neuron is depolarised, and it sends along a signal indicating the presence of spicy stimuli. Thanks heaven, we have ways to douse this fire and relieve our mouth. If your spice-tolerance levels are low like mine, this article is a lifesaver. Bookmark it, now.

Home remedies for spicy food: The spice that you feel is the capsaicin, the active ingredient​

Home remedies for spicy food: This loss of sensation in the mouth may lead you to believe otherwise​

Immediate steps to take


4 Effective Remedies To Cool Your Mouth After Eating Spicy Food

Highlights

4pm hunger pangs demand a bite of something delicious. Our dreams were recently answered when a local food stall outside the office started serving up a variety of momos. The best dish on his menu, arguably, is a plate of momos doused in a lip-smacking but mind-numbingly hot chilli sauce. The momos are so good that we can not help ordering them. These delicacies taste amazing but the after-taste they leave is almost like fire-in-the-mouth. The spice that you feel is the capsaicin, the active ingredient that binds to a special class of vanilloid receptor inside our mouth called VR1 receptors. After capsaicin binds to these receptors, the sensory neuron is depolarised, and it sends along a signal indicating the presence of spicy stimuli. Thanks heaven, we have ways to douse this fire and relieve our mouth. If your spice-tolerance levels are low like mine, this article is a lifesaver. Bookmark it, now.

Home remedies for spicy food: The spice that you feel is the capsaicin, the active ingredient​

Home remedies for spicy food: This loss of sensation in the mouth may lead you to believe otherwise​

Immediate steps to take


4 Effective Remedies To Cool Your Mouth After Eating Spicy Food

Highlights

4pm hunger pangs demand a bite of something delicious. Our dreams were recently answered when a local food stall outside the office started serving up a variety of momos. The best dish on his menu, arguably, is a plate of momos doused in a lip-smacking but mind-numbingly hot chilli sauce. The momos are so good that we can not help ordering them. These delicacies taste amazing but the after-taste they leave is almost like fire-in-the-mouth. The spice that you feel is the capsaicin, the active ingredient that binds to a special class of vanilloid receptor inside our mouth called VR1 receptors. After capsaicin binds to these receptors, the sensory neuron is depolarised, and it sends along a signal indicating the presence of spicy stimuli. Thanks heaven, we have ways to douse this fire and relieve our mouth. If your spice-tolerance levels are low like mine, this article is a lifesaver. Bookmark it, now.

Home remedies for spicy food: The spice that you feel is the capsaicin, the active ingredient​

Home remedies for spicy food: This loss of sensation in the mouth may lead you to believe otherwise​

Immediate steps to take


4 Effective Remedies To Cool Your Mouth After Eating Spicy Food

Highlights

4pm hunger pangs demand a bite of something delicious. Our dreams were recently answered when a local food stall outside the office started serving up a variety of momos. The best dish on his menu, arguably, is a plate of momos doused in a lip-smacking but mind-numbingly hot chilli sauce. The momos are so good that we can not help ordering them. These delicacies taste amazing but the after-taste they leave is almost like fire-in-the-mouth. The spice that you feel is the capsaicin, the active ingredient that binds to a special class of vanilloid receptor inside our mouth called VR1 receptors. After capsaicin binds to these receptors, the sensory neuron is depolarised, and it sends along a signal indicating the presence of spicy stimuli. Thanks heaven, we have ways to douse this fire and relieve our mouth. If your spice-tolerance levels are low like mine, this article is a lifesaver. Bookmark it, now.

Home remedies for spicy food: The spice that you feel is the capsaicin, the active ingredient​

Home remedies for spicy food: This loss of sensation in the mouth may lead you to believe otherwise​

Immediate steps to take